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Last Seven Days

Answer

As with other collective nouns, it depends on the sense of the sentence. Is the wildlife being considered as a group, or as individual bits? Generally, you'll be fine if you use a singular verb. If it sounds odd given the context of the entire sentence, then go with the plural verb. 

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No need for a comma with short phrases such as this.

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That's not covered in AP style. But I think a slash is better than a hyphen, to indicate that they are, in fact, different names rather than one hyphenated name. 

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AP style always uses the word, never the symbol. Of course, you could choose to differ from AP on this (or any) point. 

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Hyphenate it as both a noun and a verb. 

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We lowercase foreign service in that use.

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About seems a better choice: passionate about leading.

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We'd prefer to call her an artist and activist. If it's necessary to combine the terms, I think the slash is better: artist/activist.

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I'd hyphenate it for clarity. You certainly could make an argument for the noun phrase (meaning no hyphen). But I think the hyphens help, in this case.

Question from Moscow on Jan 16, 2018

  • PRONUNCIATIONS. Should be given in quotations. If emphasis is included, use capital letters. He was a co-founder of madri+d (pronounced “madri-mas- DEH”).
That said, I would still appreciate an answer. Sorry for the confusion.

Answer

Here's the entry:
When necessary to use a pronouncer, put it in parentheses immediately following the word or name. The syllable to be stressed should be in caps with an apostrophe: acetaminophen (a-see-tuh-MIHN'-oh-fen). 

Answer

We agree: leveling.

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It depends on whether you need to distinguish the Green Lake in Jonesville from a Green Lake somewhere else, such as in Fishville.

I'm guessing that there's only one Green Lake that your audience would be thinking of. In that case, the "in Jonesville" is an added piece of information but isn't essential to the sentence's meaning. Nonessential clauses are set off by commas. So it would be Green Lake, in Jonesville, was the site ...

Here's the entry with more details.


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Your understanding of AP style is correct. We'd include the comma because one of elements of the list includes and.
Here's the relevant part of the comma entry:

Put a comma before the concluding conjunction in a series if an integral element of the series requires a conjunction: I had orange juice, toast, and ham and eggs for breakfast.

I think your coworker is referring to our general guidance that the Oxford comma isn't needed in a simple series if the meaning is clear without it. But we do call for the comma in less-simple situations, such as the ones we're talking about here. 

Answer

AP style is zip-close bag. I believe the zip-lock you are seeing is in the Webster's New World College Dictionary part of the search, not the AP Stylebook. There are times when the Stylebook differs with our official dictionary. 

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We generally don't use a hyphen with the non- prefix. So, in theory, that would make it noneventful. That said, I don't know what is meant by that term and would recommend rephrasing.


Question from Moscow on Jan 16, 2018

Dear editors,
Based on three answers — namely,
one, two, and three — I assume that omitting the month in a date range is OK, provided that I use a hyphen and NOT a preposition, that is:
  1. March 5 through March 15 (good)
  2. From March 5 to March 15 (good)
  3. From March 5-15 (good)
  4. March 5-15 (good)
  5. March 5 to 15 (bad)
  6. March 5 through 15 (bad)
  7. From March 5 to 15 (bad)

Is that correct? As a nonnative speaker, No. 3 especially bugs me, because in my language it would be kind of weird to replace to with a hyphen and yet retain the other preposition (from), so I wanted to double-check.

Answer

We actually don't have a style on date ranges. Thus, some previous answers have reflected a range of possibilities based on commonly accepted practices. I would agree that your first four choices are better than the last three. In the future, we will work in coming up with more formal guidance. For now, be aware that there is a fair amount of flexibility.

Question from Tokyo on Jan 16, 2018

About Olympics / Olympic Games / Pyeongchang Games -- plural or singular verb? In your Olympics entry, both are used, but elsewhere the plural seems predominant.

Olympics, Olympic, Olympic Games, Olympian   Always capitalized: Winter Olympics and Summer Olympics. Each is staged every four years, but two years apart. The next Winter Games are in 2018 in Pyeongchang, [more...
Chapter Sports Guidelines ; Updated on Feb 29, 2012 

Answer

Generally plural. There may be some specific uses, such as the one you note, where singular is appropriate. 

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Yes, always use numerals for points under 10 in sports games.

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Yes, there are two commas setting off shift supervisor when it comes after the name. In other words, your first example is correct. 

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Either is fine. (Note that in AP style, we wouldn't use the shorthand GSE at all.)

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Whom can you ask for feedback? 

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Common usage allows for constructions such as a North American business, a South Korean company, a Japanese automaker, a French manufacturer.



Answer

The first one is correct. The second one isn't necessary. Here's the entry:

 on 

 Do not use on before a date or day of the week when its absence would not lead to confusion, except at the beginning of a sentence: The meeting will be held Monday. He will be inaugurated Jan. 20. On Sept. 3, the committee will meet to discuss the issue.
Use on to avoid an awkward juxtaposition of a date and a proper name: John met Mary on Monday. He told Obama on Thursday that the bill was doomed.
Use on also to avoid any suggestion that a date is the object of a transitive verb: The House killed on Tuesday a bid to raise taxes. The Senate postponed on Wednesday its consideration of a bill to reduce import duties.

Answer

Either is fine. It's really a matter of preference in this case. 

Question from Liverpool, NY on Jan 14, 2018

All of the responses say there should be no hyphens, and the example given is "The animal appeared to have been well cared for." But it seems to me that the phrase is a bit confusing when placed before a noun:  "The resort provides guests with well cared for horses." Following AP rules for hyphenated compound adjectives, inserting commas in this usage would seem to add to both clarity and readability: "The resort provides quest with well-cared-for horses." What do you say?

Answer

Yes, I agree it should be hyphenated before the noun.

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