Ask the Editor

Last Seven Days

Answer

Yes, if it's a composition title.


Answer

No hyphen; it's easily understood without one.

Answer

Use all of before a pronoun: All of us, all of them. Otherwise, all and all of are pretty much interchangeable. Sometimes adding of helps the rhythm of a particular sentence; sometimes it just adds unnecessary verbiage. 



Answer

Blue Hawaiian.


Answer

Use the guidelines in the composition titles entry, which also applies to e-books. (AP style uses the hyphen in e-books.)

Answer

It depends on the meaning, and I'm not sure of the terminology. Are you talking about enriched uranium-235? Then it's 90 percent enriched uranium-235.  Or do you mean  uranium-235 that's 90 percent enriched? In that case, it's 90 percent-enriched uranium-235.

Question from Loudonville, NY on June 17, 2019

Re: Dreyer

From Dreyer . . . the “very”s and “quite”s and “rather”s and “actually”s in which many (most?) of us bury our writing like so many packing peanuts. — Benjamin Dreyer



Based on his examples above, would you opt for “as”s, “his”s, “was”s  . . . or “as”es, “is”es, “was”es?

I’d go with, personally, “as”s, “his”s, “was”s, because the quotation marks adequately set each word apart, making it apparent that the s that follows indicates a plural; thus the 
-es endings are not necessary. Do you agree?

Thank you.




Answer

You know the response: Rephrase! But as a purely academic exercise, and if you promise not to put me through too many more of these purely academic exercises, I would agree with your preferred option. If for some reason I couldn't rewrite it.


Answer

Thank you for making my day with the cat ipsum!

We don't cover that specific scenario; it's not one that comes up very often. I mean, really, why would someone quote a bulleted list (even one in Cat)? 

But if for some reason it's necessary, I think the way you have it punctuated as best (though we put periods at the end of each item in a list, even if it's not a complete sentence). Adding quote marks at the beginning of each item in the list would just look cluttered. So:

"Cat ipsum dolor sit amet, favor packaging over toy carefully drink from water glass and then spill it everywhere and proceed to lick the puddle carefully drink from water glass and then spill it everywhere and proceed to lick the puddle. Drink:
— Water glass.
— Puddle.
— Fishbowl.
— Puddle.
"Paw at your fat belly fish i must find my red catnip fishy fish and ignore the human until she needs to get up, then climb on her lap and sprawl."


Answer

Yes, you need the comma after 30. Also, AP style is 2 p.m.

Answer

I'd say it's optional. Others might disagree.

Answer

We have several uses for the dash, according to the entry. I'd have to see some specific examples of what you're talking about before I could say if we think that's OK. Offhand, I can't really think how a dash could be substituted for a semicolon. But it's early in the morning and maybe the coffee hasn't kicked in!


dash (—) 


Follow these guidelines:ABRUPT CHANGE: Use dashes to denote an abrupt change in thought in a sentence or an emphatic pause: Through her long reign, the queen and her family have adapted — usually skillfully — to the changing taste of the time. But avoid overuse of dashes to set off phrases when commas would suffice.SERIES WITHIN A PHRASE: When a phrase that otherwise would be set off by commas contains a series of words that must be separated by commas, use dashes to set off the full phrase: He listed the qualities — intelligence, humor, conservatism, independence — that he liked in an executive.ATTRIBUTION: Use a dash before an author's or composer's name at the end of a quotation: "Who steals my purse steals trash." — Shakespeare.IN DATELINES:NEW YORK (AP) — The city is broke.IN LISTS: See lists, bulleted lists.WITH SPACES: Put a space on both sides of a dash in all uses except sports agate summaries.See em dash, en dash, hyphen.



Answer

We wouldn't use a comma there. Fans of the Oxford comma would disagree vehemently and vociferously. But we argue that it's not necessary for clarity in this case and thus not necessary. 


Answer

Round without the apostrophe is an acceptable synonym for around. I don't know that it's misspelled with the apostrophe, but the apostrophe isn't necessary (so why use it?)


Answer

I don't recall that we've ever had an entry. Webster's New World College Dictionary does allow further in the sense of moreover (or furthermore). 
Here are the dictionary entries:

furthermore  adv. [[ME further more]] in addition; besides; moreover: used with conjunctive force 


fur•ther 

(fʉr´thər)

adj. [[ME < OE furthor (akin to Ger vorder) < base of fore, fore + compar. suffix < IE *-tero- (as in after, other)]]  1 alt. compar. of far 2 additional; more 3 more distant or remote; farther —adv. [[ME < OE further, orig. a neut. acc. of the adj.]]  1 alt. compar. of far 2 to a greater degree or extent 3 in addition; moreover 4 at or to a greater distance or more remote point in space or time; farther ➥In sense 3 of the adj. and sense 4 of the adv., farther is more commonly used —vt. [[ME furthren < OE fyrthrian< furthra, furthor]] to give aid to; promote—SYN. advance —fur´therer n.


Answer

Yes, that includes use as a modifier: health care system.


Answer

I was blissfully off on Friday. Today I look at this and, with all due respect to Mr. Dreyer, am happy that I don't have to choose because all of these hurt my eyes. But where does he say this? I'm not immediately finding it. I do see, on Page 37, no quotes around dos, don'ts, yeses and nos.


Answer

Yes, we use Sichuan in all uses: China's Sichuan province.

Answer

... according to The Associated Press Stylebook, or The Associated Press Stylebook says: XXX.

(I hope you're using the 2019 edition or the online version, to be sure you are quoting up-to-date material.)


Answer

AP doesn't have a specific style. I see that Webster's New World College Dictionary (which you may get as part of your Stylebook subscription) uses Rhode Island Red, as does Merriam-Webster. I can't speak to their reasoning for sure, but I imagine it's for clarity to distinguish from a general reference to the color.

Answer

I'd use the guidance in the composition titles entry. 



Answer

If it's a title or a headline, AP style uses single quote marks.

Answer

With the hyphens.


Question from Wauwatosa, WI on June 13, 2019

Is this how you'd write this? 

There's no "I" in "Team."

Answer

The way you have it is fine.


Answer

Use the double quote marks.


Answer

Crosshairs, per Webster's New World College Dictionary (and Merriam-Webster has similar)


cross•hair 

(krôs´)

n. a line or, typically, one of a pair of crossed lines, as of fine wire or hair, mounted in the eyepiece of a telescopic gun sight, surveyor's level, etc. to assist in precise aiming or centering of the instrument: also sp. cross hair –in the (or someone’s) crosshairs targeted (by someone) for hostile or critical action or scrutiny


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