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Last Seven Days

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Yes, assuming your readers know what you're talking about, or you explain it.

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You might well need the ellipses, depending on what was said before. How does it affect the meaning? But I wouldn't use the parentheses.

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I'm not immediately seeing where we say that our style for the possessive of U.S. is U.S.'s, but I wouldn't argue with it. It's easier to read and understand than U.S.' and indeed, U.S. ends with a period, not an s.

On the other hand, I'd use AMS' as the plural. That considers AMS a proper name, and follows the style for possessives of proper names ending in s:

SINGULAR PROPER NAMES ENDING IN S: Use only an apostrophe: Achilles' heel, Agnes' book, Ceres' rites, Descartes' theories, Dickens' novels, Euripides' dramas, Hercules' labors, Jesus' life, Jules' seat, Kansas' schools, Moses' law, Socrates' life, Tennessee Williams' plays, Xerxes' armies.


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We capitalize if at the start of the sentence.

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Most usages I see consider UBO to mean ultimate beneficial owner (singular). Thus, more than one would be UBOs. And the plural possessive is UBOs'.

Changes mandated by this directive include the following: granting general public access to UBOs'  information for companies based in the EU. 


Question from Baltimore, MD on Jan. 27, 2020

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We use both versions.

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Hasn't been resolved yet. Hope to do so soon!

Question from Austin, TX on Jan. 27, 2020

ANSWER We use a hyphen with the prefix re- when it is followed by a word with the same vowel. (See AP Stylebook entries on "re-" and "prefixex.")

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Bandwidth (mine) is definitely a big issue. I delete outdated entries as I find them, and I do search specifically for outdated entries as much as possible. Thanks for pointing out this one. I've deleted the previous answers.


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We don't have an entry for kick-start; you're looking at the Webster's New World College Dictionary entry, which you get as part of your Stylebook Online subscription. Both the Stylebook and the dictionary do use kickoff. As for why the difference: It's one of the many, many oddities of usage and the language. 

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Yes, I'd use the hyphen.

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There's no change in guidance regarding hyphen that applies to this question, and the answer is a matter of preference. I'd use pre-deployment and post-deployment.

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I'm not sure what it means. So I can't figure out how to punctuate it. Do you mean most-recalled messages? (How many recalled messages can there possibly be?!)

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I'd use the possessive, and treat Sales as a proper name. So this is correct: Sales' Selection: Vandelay Industries, Widgets 'n More, Acme Inc.

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Yes, it's outdated. I'll delete it. Thanks.

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We're using Deir el-Zour .

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Day 10. We use numerals for 10 and higher.

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I'd use the. Sometimes local usage is to omit articles in such uses. In your case, I'd say it sounds much better to use the article.

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Yes, that's right. Or if there's a specific charge, use the charge.

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Thank you for making me smile this morning! (For the record, I am trying to read and type with dilated eyes, after an eye doctor appointment). I guess I was so busy trying to get caught up after the holidays and then being sick that I neglected to take down the "away" message. Thanks for pointing that out. We'll attend to it shortly. And thank you for your support. Much appreciated.


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The first one. But maybe avoid the unpleasant word differentiators?

Our quality and service set us apart in  attracting and retaining customer loyalty.
Our quality and service make the crucial difference in attracting and retaining customer loyalty.

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Singular.

Question from Austin, TX on Jan. 23, 2020

Hate to be a pain, but when searching on "seahorse" this contradiction came up and I just don't understand the latest answer: 

Deferring to the dictionary's primary spelling: sea horse.

So the first answerer says it's OK to go along with writers who didn't use the dictionary? Why? Because that person likes seahorses, er, sea horses? What's the point of all this if we go along with the spelling of people who didn't consult the right resource and follow it? Feels very subjective for a style guide.

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Much of the language, and much of any style guide, is subjective. Some rules are absolute. Other guidance is just that: guidance.

Sometimes, there's only one acceptable spelling by anyone's definition. Horse, for example, when meaning the animal. Sea, when meaning the body of water. Other examples: Spelling. Words. Writing. Editing. Frustration. Inconsistency. Welcome. To. My. Life.

Other times, a word may have varying spellings depending on the source. Webster's New World College Dictionary prefers the two-word sea horse. Merriam-Webster prefers the one-word seahorse. While AP style and AP writers generally follow Webster's New World College Dictionary, we also have exceptions based on usage or other reasons.

In this case, AP usage over time has preferred seahorse. Given that it's an acceptable spelling recognized by an established and respected dictionary, I'm willing to accept that one-word version as one of our exceptions to our primary dictionary.



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Technically, it's: Day One through Day Nine, then Day 10, Day 11, Day 12, etc.

That said, and as our numbers guidance continues to be under review, I'd also say this: If you're listing a number of days, I'd probably go with all numerals for consistency and for what makes most sense to your readers. Day 1, Day 5, Day 50, etc.



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The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act. (Note: it's Privacy Protection, not Protection Privacy)

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The District 4 commander, Adm. Keith Smith, presided over the ceremony.

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