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Last Seven Days

Answer

Commas are OK. But two other thoughts. One: Many words separate My faith in knowing ... from is what keeps me strong. It's hard to keep track of the train of thought or figure out where the sentence is going. Could you rewrite: What keeps me strong: my faith in knowing ... (etc).

Two: You could either take out the second that, with the thought that the clause is covered (like the others) by the first that; or add that before the other two clauses for consistency. I prefer the second approach: My faith in knowing that God loves me,  that God loves my daughter, that God is greater than any number and that his plan is always greater than mine is what keeps me strong. (Though, of course, Problem No. 1 remains.)

Of course, if it's direct quote, you can't alter it. But perhaps you could paraphrase rather than use the actual quote?


Answer

I'd make it: reference-based pricing plan. The reasoning: You can view reference-based pricing as a recognizable concept (including the hyphen in reference-based as a compound modifiier). Looked at another way, you also can view pricing plan as a single concept. Either view eliminates the need for that second hyphen, particularly when our goal is to use hyphens only when necessary for clarity.

Others, as you can see, might differ.



Answer

We don't have guidelines for that. In fact, we've changed the order of the front of our own book a few times, as contents of the front of the book changed. The 2018 Stylebook has the Contents page before the Foreword, About the AP, What's new and Key to Stylebook entries pages. The Contents page includes all of those pages.


Answer

AP lowercases red tide.


Answer

We prefer digitize.

Answer

No, the term registered nurse is lowercase.

Answer

The term board of directors is always lowercase in AP style, including when following a company or organization name: the NBA board of directors.


Answer

In AP style, it's the Nebraska congressional delegation.


Answer

He plays for the Eagles in the NFL.


Answer

Two words in that use: Let's move on to the next question.

Answer

Doe Jr., John

Answer

We try to avoid it, though sometimes we make allowances for space reasons. But remember: I know what DOJ means. You know what DOJ means. Everyone in our entire organizations knows what DOJ means. Not everyone, however, knows what we know or uses the same lingo or shorthand. Don't turn off your readers ... (of course, if you're writing for a specific audience that wouldn't be confused, it's probably fine).

Answer

The way you've written it works just fine.


Answer

Both are equally acceptable. That's the word from Webster's New World College Dictionary, which is the Stylebook's official dictionary.

Answer

We use 3D in all references.


Answer

The way you have it is correct. AP wouldn't use the year if it's within the current calendar year. But if there's a chance for confusion, then do use the year.


Answer

We would spell it out. If EP on first reference makes more sense for your specific audience, then do what seems right for that audience.



Answer

The way you have it is correct.


Answer

We don't have a preference; it's not a term that we would use since it's not recognizable to many readers.


Question from Warr Acres, OK on Sept. 17, 2018

Is it Wi-Fi or WiFi?

Answer

AP style is Wi-Fi.


Answer

We defer to Webster's New World College Dictionary: will call.


Answer

AP uses just Israel, except in quotes, when we lowercase state: "It's a good day for the state of Israel," he said.

Answer

I don't think the hyphen is necessary. I think readers understand business travel as a single concept.



Answer

The AP Stylebook's official dictionary is Webster's New World College Dictionary, which shows only bull's-eye. Your link is to a different dictionary. This is one of many examples in the English language in which more than one style or spelling is acceptable; it's a matter of which style you choose to follow. If you wish to use Your Dictionary instead of Webster's New World College Dictionary for this or any word, that's certainly your option. I see from Your Dictionary's bullseye entry that it also differs from AP with spellings such as centre and cancelled.


Answer

I'm not seeing bullseye in my search of Webster's New World College Dictionary. A previous Ask the Editor  said:

Question from Huntsville, Ala. on Feb. 28, 2013  Is the noun "bull's eye" or "bullseye" or "bull's-eye"?

Answer
Deferring to Webster's bull's-eye. 


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