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Last Seven Days

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I'd use the hyphen in both of those.

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The writer says he should have used Ion, and will do so in the future. Thanks for noting it.

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If they said COVID, write COVID (without the -19). If you're using AP style, it is COVID, not Covid. "My friend is recovering from COVID," he said.


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Nonregion, according to our style. I'll confess that non-region looks much more readable to me, and I'd likely use the hyphenated version for that reason. 

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A hyphen and no quotation marks, according to Webster's New World College Dictionary:
go-to  adj. [Informal] trusted to perform dependably or skillfully, esp. in a critical situation [a quarterback's go-to receiver]

Question from New York City on Sept. 24, 2020

Should we capitalize the White House coronavirus task force?

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We capitalize White House but not the rest in that term.

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AP style doesn't spell out numbers 10 and over. We would write: There will be a limit of 12 students in each class.

If you're using your own house style instead, then it's your choice on what to do. I'd ask, though, why spell out twelve if you feel it's necessary to use the numeral as well.

(We also wouldn't use the numeral in parentheses for nine and under. Simply: There will be a limit of nine students in each class.)


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First, is "every" accurate? Ot is it an exaggeration at all?
That's not a good use of the semicolon.
I'd do it this way: We have every MOS from Marine traffic management specialists to preservation, packaging, packing, and marketing specialists to Marine Corps aviation supply specialists and Navy logistics specialists.


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That's a hard construction to parse, as a reader. I gather data center is one term in this sentence, and the connections are within that data center? I'd reword to eliminate the intra problem, which just confuses things. How about: The company creates tranceiver chips for connections within the data center. Or if you mean between different data centers (which would be inter-): The company creates tranceiver chips for connections between data centers. 

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It's good as you have it.

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I'd attribute specifically to the transcript on the WHO website, and then keep it as written in the transcript.

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With the standard double quote marks. Make sure it's clear from the context, as you have done, that it's a hypothetical quotation.

AP style is OK, not okay. 

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Regardless of what Merriam-Webster says, we would indeed hyphenate low-carb as a modifier.

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How about recasting? Otherwise you're bound to give some readers pause no matter which option you use.

This seems easier to read, and snappier:

Another key feature you’ll want: pant legs that fit over boots.

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Same idea. The subject that is closest to the verb. 

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We don't use it as a verb, though as you note some dictionaries do accept it. We would say: raise money.

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Not in AP style. Here's the guidance. 

doctor 


Use Dr. in first reference as a formal title before the name of an individual who holds a doctor of dental surgery, doctor of medicine, doctor of optometry, doctor of osteopathic medicine, doctor of podiatric medicine, or doctor of veterinary medicine: Dr. Jonas Salk.
The form Dr., or Drs. in a plural construction, applies to all first-reference uses before a name, including direct quotations. Do not continue the use of Dr. in subsequent references.
Do not use Dr. before the names of individuals who hold other types of doctoral degrees. Instead, when necessary or appropriate for a specific audience: Cassandra Karoub, who has a doctorate in mathematics, was lead researcher. In a list: Stephanie D’Ercole, Ph.D.


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I'm not sure what you're asking. The quote should be whatever the speaker said. If you're basically writing a script for Harris to say, it's your choice on first or last names. Whatever Harris would choose to say, if he were saying it.

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If you expect that people will indeed be viewing the video at any time, I'd use the present tense. If the video just happens to be available but people probably won't be watching it in the future, said may make more sense.

Generally I'd default to says.


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As you have it is correct in both examples.

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Indeed, we don't have a style. Technically, we lowercase job titles if not before a name. This arguably could be a different scenario. I'd say it's your choice.

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No hyphen, as noted in this section of the hyphen entry:

Hyphenate well- combinations before a noun, but not after: a well-known judge, but the judge is well known.


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We have not received a request, and at this time we have no plans to change long-standing and widely accepted style. We continue to use Shinzo Abe.

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I would do it as you have it. But really, I would find a way to recast to avoid this situation. 

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The 2017 and 2011 answers are outdated. I'll delete them. Thanks for pointing them out!

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Coronavirus Topical Guide

To help with coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19, The Associated Press has prepared a guide based on the AP Stylebook and common usage in AP stories. For more details, follow AP coverage of...


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