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Last Seven Days

Answer

You need some reference in the attribution showing that the person speaking is associated with the company. Some examples (and note the changes in bold to conform with grammar and style):

“As the energy industry continues to transition to cleaner, sustainable production, Renewable Energy Group is at the forefront of this transition, providing our customers fuel solutions that are easy to use and deliver carbon reduction now,” said Renewable Energy Group's president and CEO, Cynthia ‘CJ’ Warner.

or

“As the energy industry continues to transition to cleaner, sustainable production, Renewable Energy Group is at the forefront of this transition, providing our customers fuel solutions that are easy to use and deliver carbon reduction now,” said the company's president and CEO, Cynthia ‘CJ’ Warner.

Or to use the title as a title and not a descriptor, omit the comma and use the capitalized President:

“As the energy industry continues to transition to cleaner, sustainable production, Renewable Energy Group is at the forefront of this transition, providing our customers fuel solutions that are easy to use and deliver carbon reduction now,” said Renewable Energy Group President and CEO Cynthia ‘CJ’ Warner.

“As the energy industry continues to transition to cleaner, sustainable production, Renewable Energy Group is at the forefront of this transition, providing our customers fuel solutions that are easy to use and deliver carbon reduction now,” said company President and CEO Cynthia ‘CJ’ Warner.


Answer

As you have it is perfect.

Answer

It's understood that the speaker hasn't changed. As you have it is correct.

Answer

I'd go with M-F or Mon.-Fri. 
We don't have a specific style.

Answer

We use the hyphen for ranges such as that. AP style doesn't use en dashes at all.

Question from on July 22, 2021

Is evidence a plural noun, please? Thanks~

Answer

Singular, at least in the U.S.

Answer

The 16th District, the 16th Senate District, the 16th state Senate District.

Answer

No comma after webinar in this example. The comma before or for emphasis is fine.

Answer

Let's go with geoblocking. I've deleted the previous answer.

Answer

It is indeed hard to believe there's never been a question, or an entry, on this point. We'd use "Rickrolling," in quotes, with the capital letter since it derives from a proper name.  

Answer

I imagine there might be an occasional reason in a certain context, with wording that explains it. But generally, no. It's confusing to readers, to say the least! 


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It depends on whether you regard resolve and dedication to excellent as a single concept, or resolve and dedication to excellence as separate concepts or traits. I have a hard time seeing those as one combined concept. They seem like distinct traits to me. So I'd use the plural: have.

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Often when a warning bell goes off in your head, it's best to heed it. I'd go with the warm fall sun.

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Yes. And we'd make it one-day, two-day, etc.

Answer

One of three prizes, but a 1 in 3 chance of winning. (Yes, it's confusing.)

Answer

We wouldn't use the shorthand for our general audiences.

Question from Sugar Land, Texas, on July 20, 2021

Hello! Is it hyphenated? "A near-infinite supply . . . "

Answer

Yes, use the hyphen there.

Answer

Regard Cuban sandwich as a single term. So, Cuban sandwich-inspired pork.

Answer

We are fine with starting a sentence with but.

Answer

No hyphen: a 2 million-gallon water tank.

Answer

I think you're looking at the Webster's New World College Dictionary entry, which you may have as part of your Stylebook Online subscription:

Webster's New World College Dictionary (5th Edition) (One result)

wholly-owned  adj. designating or of a subsidiary company all of whose common stock is owned by another company

The dictionary does hyphenate the term. AP style does not, in keeping with our guidance about not using a hyphen after words ending in -ly.

This is one of many cases of different styles. Neither is absolutely right or wrong. It's just a different style. We generally conform with Webster's New World College Dictionary, but not always.



Question from Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, on July 20, 2021

Which is correct: a 2,000-pound munition or a 2000-pound munition without the comma?

Answer

With the comma.

Question from Tokyo, on July 20, 2021

Hi, a question about "whereabouts is" vs. "whereabouts are". According to you, this takes a singular verb. But Merriam-Webster, while agreeing with you as a strictly pedantic point of view, points out that common usage is to favor the plural verb.

AP news stories also tend to use "whereabout are", see e.g. here and here

I don't know about you, but my ear prefers "are". 

Is your advice still the same?

Answer

We will take a look at it. I agree that whereabouts are certainly is commonly used and accepted. Thanks for asking.

Answer

Follow local usage. The term state is often used informally for commonwealths.

Answer

Lowercase in the first example.

In the second:

Associate Administrator for the Health Mission Society Joe Smith
or
The associate administrator for the Health Mission Society, Dr. Joe Smith


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