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Last Seven Days

Answer

Use the lowercase. 

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We don't retain the comma. Here's the entry in our coronavirus Topical Guide:

CARES Act

Avoid using this term unless in a direct quotation in reference to the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act. Instead, use phrasing such as the coronavirus relief bill, the coronavirus aid bill, the coronavirus rescue package, etc., for the U.S. government’s $2.2 trillion package to help businesses, workers and a health care system staggered by the coronavirus.

Answer

Here's the entry in the Coronavirus Topical Guide:

CARES Act

Avoid using this term unless in a direct quotation in reference to the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act. Instead, use phrasing such as the coronavirus relief bill, the coronavirus aid bill, the coronavirus rescue package, etc., for the U.S. government’s $2.2 trillion package to help businesses, workers and a health care system staggered by the coronavirus.


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I'd use screen-share for the noun. I'd rather use share your screen, share my screen, etc., than screen-share as a verb. But if you must ...

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Self-isolation in those uses:

isolation, quarantine

According to the CDC: Isolation is separating sick people from healthy people to prevent spread of disease. For example, people believed to have COVID-19 or to have been exposed to the coronavirus are put in isolation in hospitals or are asked to practice self-isolation. Quarantine separates and restricts the movement of people who were exposed to a contagious disease to see if they become sick.

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Yes. We are panic-buying toilet paper. 

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We use more words and say: people sewing masks. Or, indeed, sewer. But I think using a few more words is better.

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I'd use the hyphen.

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On second reference, use the last name only.

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I'd make it over-bromination and over-chlorination for clarity.

Question from Pasay City, Philippines on April 07, 2020

Is it noncompliance or non-compliance?

Answer

It's noncompliance:


non- 


The rules of prefixes apply, but in general no hyphen when forming a compound that does not have special meaning and can be understood if not is used before the base word. Use a hyphen, however, before proper nouns. Examples of compounds with special meaning include names with proper nouns: Non-Aligned Movement, non-Euclidean geometry, non-Hodgkin lymphoma.


Answer

Yes, it's rescue. Here's part of the entry from Webster's New World College Dictionary:


res•cue 

(res´kyoo)

vt. -cued, -cuing [[ME rescuen < OFr rescourre < re-, again + escorre, to shake, move < L excutere, to shake off, drive away < ex-, off + quatere, to shake: see quash2]]  1 to free or save from danger, imprisonment, evil, etc. 2 Law to take (a person or thing) out of legal custody by force —n. the act or an instance of rescuing; deliverance —adj.designating or of an animal, esp. a dog or cat, that has been adopted as a pet from a pound, animal shelter, etc. —res´cuable adj. —res´cuer n.


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We used standard capitalization. Here's the company names entry for more guidance.

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We would use lowercase inspection contingency, notice of defects in writing for general audiences. If you are writing for a very specific audience of real estate licensees, it might make sense to use Inspection Contingency, etc. Please don't use all-caps!

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Thanks for asking. We'll put it on the list for consideration. But that likely won't happen in the immediate future.

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I've deleted the 2015 answer. Make it S corporation, using the IRS style.

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... mark a milestone ...

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We don't have a style for that.

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I agree with you.

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I think it's clear without the hyphens, but I'd probably use them just in case. It really could be argued either way.

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A questionnaire is the actual form that people fill out. The term survey also can be used for that form,  and it can be used in a broader sense. See our polls and surveys chapter for much more guidance. 

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Yes, but we prefer not using the form at all. Why not just concerns (or whatever) related to COVID-19.

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No, we wouldn't do that.

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Yes, that's correct.

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This gets into a complicated consideration of coordinate vs. cumulative adjectives. Some examples are more clear-cut than others. I think yours could be read either of the two ways you describe. I would go with Option 2, viewing new customer card options as a single thing, modified by exciting

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From the Pronunciation Guide

Kyiv

KEE'-yeev

Capital of Ukraine (new spelling and pronunciation)

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From the Topical Guides

Coronavirus Topical Guide

To help with coverage of the new coronavirus disease, called COVID-19, The Associated Press has prepared a guide based on the AP Stylebook and common usage in AP stories. For more details, follow...


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