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Last Seven Days

Answer

They're not interchangeable at least in some uses. Usage depends on the rest of the sentence. I don't know what you have in mind. Could you provide a few examples? (We hold no formal position on this point, but I could give my thoughts.)

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Yes, the hyphen is right in that use. And thanks for the explanation of the audience. That makes sense.

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There's no rule of thumb that I know of. I'd aim for what makes most sense/causes least confusion for readers. How about this, using single quote marks within the quotation and capital letters:

"My joke is that I already have a degree from `Real-World University.' "


Answer

We consider those occupational descriptions and lowercase them before names.

FORMAL TITLES: Capitalize formal titles when they are used immediately before one or more names: Pope Francis, President Donald Trump, Vice Presidents Yukari Nakamura and Vanessa Smith.
A formal title generally is one that denotes a scope of authority, professional activity or academic activity: Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, Dr. Benjamin Spock, retired Gen. Colin Powell.
Other titles serve primarily as occupational descriptions: astronaut Sally Ride, poet Maya Angelou, peanut farmer Jimmy Carter.
A final determination on whether a title is formal or occupational depends on the practice of the governmental or private organization that confers it.


Answer

See the guidance below on fewer and less. In your first example, I'd use less emissions since the meaning is a bulk or quantity of emissions, not each individual emission.

I'm not sure what 99% lower emissions means. 

fewer, less 


In general, use fewer for individual items, less for bulk or quantity.
Wrong: The trend is toward more machines and less people. (People in this sense refers to individuals.)
Wrong: She was fewer than 60 years old. (Years in this sense refers to a period of time, not individual years.)
Right: Fewer than 10 applicants called. (Individuals.)
Right: I had less than $50 in my pocket. (An amount.) But: I had fewer than 50 $1 bills in my pocket.(Individual items.)


Answer

This section of the quotations in the news entry addresses that:

When quoting spoken words, present them in the format that reflects AP style: No. 1, St., Gov., $3. But quotes should not be changed otherwise for reasons of style. If the speaker says towards, do not change it to toward.

But certainly, if you prefer to write out such words in closed captioning, you can do that. Many organizations generally follow AP style but vary in some areas depending on their own needs or preferences.


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Thanks! We'll get it fixed, though maybe not until next week because of vacation.

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The easiest way would be to add your custom entries and custom notes to Stylebook Online, so all your users can see our guidance and yours in one place.
We continue to revise and expand our race and gender guidance, so pointing your team to our entries online means they will get the most up-to-date iteration of that guidance.
Alternatively, if you want to maintain a separate internal style guide, you could link to our entries, such as https://apstylebook.com/ap_stylebook/race-related-coverage
You could note any on which you're choosing a different style.


Question from Washington, District of Columbia on Aug. 12, 2020

Based on the entry on over-, and without guidance from Webster's, I believe it should be overpolicing. Is that correct? Or does AP prefer over-policing? 

Answer

For spelling, we prefer overpolicing based on the guidance you cite. Explain the term if it's not clear from the context.

Answer

We'd use the lowercase for team in that use.

Answer

If everything else is capitalized, I'd capitalize GM as well.

Answer

Yes, we will have an updated guide. I hope this can be done in the next few weeks.

Question from North Canton, Ohio on Aug. 11, 2020

Which is correct, Q&A's or Q&As? 

Answer

Q&A's

Answer

Either is fine in that usage. I'd use on.

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We haven't used the term for years. But I'd recommend all-uppercase to avoid confusion.

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AP style is MP4.

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One word as an adjective, according to this entry in Webster's New World College Dictionary (showing usage though not as an actual entry):

Webster's New World College Dictionary (5th Edition) (One result)


counterintuitive  adj. contrary to an intuitive belief or to commonsense expectations

He uses common sense when creating commonsense expectations.

Answer

The dates are fine. We don't use a space with the hyphen, so it's Program order period: July 1, 2020-Dec. 31, 2020.

Here's the guidance: 

months 


Capitalize the names of months in all uses. When a month is used with a specific date, abbreviate only Jan., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov. and Dec. Spell out when using alone, or with a year alone.
When a phrase lists only a month and a year, do not separate the year with commas. When a phrase refers to a month, day and year, set off the year with commas.
EXAMPLES: January 2016 was a cold month. Jan. 2 was the coldest day of the month.His birthday is May 8. Feb. 14, 2013, was the target date. She testified that it was Friday, Dec. 3, when the crash occurred.


Answer

Either initial meeting or kickoff meeting. They have essentially the same meaning in this use. Kickoff is more dramatic.


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Yes, that's fine.

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We wouldn't capitalize it standing alone, just as we wouldn't capitalize president or any other title standing alone: Barack Obama is a former president of the United States.


Answer

From the Coronavirus Topical Guide:

personal protective equipment

Equipment worn to minimize exposure to hazards that cause serious injuries and illnesses. Don’t use PPE. If necessary to use PPE in a direct quotation, spell it out later and explain the term.

Answer

If this email was forwarded to you ...

Answer

We'd delete the comma, and make any other changes that might be necessary for style, grammar, clarity, etc., and then show and explain the changes to the board chair. I wouldn't consider it a long quotation. But again, I'd make sure that the author knows of the changes.


Question from New York, New York on Aug. 10, 2020

Hi! I'm so confused. A number of people have asked about formatting a lecture SERIES name, and the answers always refer to the "lecture entry," which does not mention how to handle a series name, just the actual lecture name. For example, in the sentence "... she said in her lecture How to Publish a Book, in our lecture series Ask the Author," how would you handle "Ask the Author"?

Thanks!
Molly Frances
Maplewood, NJ

QUESTION from Richmond, Va. on March 20, 2012
ANSWERSee "lectures" entry, which applies in your examples.
QUESTION from San Francisco on Feb. 27, 2012
ANSWERYes, see "lectures" entry.
QUESTION from Richmond, Va. on Feb. 07, 2013
ANSWERThe name is capitalized and enclosed in quotes, according to the Stylebook's "lecture" entry.
QUESTION from Richmond, Va. on Jan. 11, 2012
ANSWERCapitalize and use quotation marks for their formal titles. See "lectures" entry.

Answer

Same guidance applies for lecture series as for lectures.

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From the Topical Guides

Coronavirus Topical Guide

To help with coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19, The Associated Press has prepared a guide based on the AP Stylebook and common usage in AP stories. For more details, follow AP coverage of...


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