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Last Seven Days

Answer

I don't think it's necessary.

Here's the relevant section of the hyphen entry:

Many combinations that are hyphenated before a noun are not hyphenated when they occur after a noun: She works full time. She is well aware of the consequences. The children are soft spoken. The play is second rate. The calendar is up to date. (Guidance changed in 2019 to remove the rule that said to hyphenate following a form of the verb to be.)
But use a hyphen if confusion could otherwise result, especially with longer compound modifiers or those that are not as commonly used: The steel surface should be blast-cleaned. The technology is state-of-the-art. The test was multiple choice and fill-in-the-blank. He will work arm-in-arm with the director.


Answer

Do you mean hyphenate? Yes, I'd hyphenate that use.

Answer

We use the term fintech (lowercase) but not the other term.

Answer

Here's the entry for the general terms. If a particular university has a specific name for a degree that falls outside the general guidelines, use that specific style.

academic degrees 


If mention of degrees is necessary to establish someone's credentials, the preferred form is to avoid an abbreviation and use instead a phrase such as: John Jones, who has a doctorate in psychology.Use an apostrophe in bachelor's degree, a master's, etc., but there is no possessive in Bachelor of Arts or Master of Science.Also: an associate degree (no possessive).Use such abbreviations as B.A., M.A., LL.D. and Ph.D. only when the need to identify many individuals by degree on first reference would make the preferred form cumbersome. Use these abbreviations only after a full name — never after just a last name.When used after a name, an academic abbreviation is set off by commas: John Snow, Ph.D., spoke.Do not precede a name with a courtesy title for an academic degree and follow it with the abbreviation for the degree in the same reference.

Answer

Yes, all of that is correct.

Answer

We lowercase such uses.


Answer

We're sticking with the apostrophe.



Question from Chicago, IL on Aug. 20, 2019

In the "awhile" vs. "a while" debate, what about "It has been awhile/a while since I saw so-and-so."? 

awhile  (adv.) a while He plans to stay awhile (adv.). He plans to stay for a while (n.). 
Chapter A

Answer

awhile.

Answer

We're debating these very questions. Stay tuned ...

Question from Camarillo, CA on Aug. 20, 2019

 
I found this entry but am still not positive about some color combinations: Q. If bluish-green is hyphenated, are other two-word colors like these hyphenated: light brown, deep red, dark green etc.? A. shades of color don't require hyphens, either as standalones or modifiers: light brown hair, deep red dress, dark green leaves. 2008-06-06 (Source: Ask the Editor, Spelling) Would "a mint green shirt" or "coffee bean brown eyes" be hyphenated? Wasn't sure if those are considered shades. Thanks! 

from Carlsbad, Calif. on Nov. 09, 2010

Those shades don't require hyphens.
 

Answer

Thanks for your good wishes! The healing is going very slowly, as is the typing. Apparently this could last for many more weeks.

As for your question, it's one of those judgment calls and not everyone makes the same judgment. It comes down to whether you think the meaning is clear without the hyphen. The rubasse entry is actually from Webster's New World College Dictionary, which you get as part of your Stylebook Online subscription. Webster's uses the hyphen in ruby-red as a modifier. I would argue that it's perfectly clear with no hyphen and thus the hyphen isn't necessary.

Maddening, I know.


Answer

This is a judgment call, but I'd say no hyphen is necessary. The term black sand beach is commonly recognizable to mosr people who would be reading about beaches. The hyphen doesn't add clarity and thus isn't needed.

Answer

Yes. Spell it out and don't use the acronym when writing for general audiences. On second reference: continuing education or continuing ed.


Answer

Yes, capitalize it as part of the "word."


Answer

You're right in wanting to avoid confusion that could occur with lager to bourbon if there's no hyphen. Bourbon-barrel-aged is a bit clunky, but it's better than being confusing. 


Answer

Our colleagues at Webster's New World College Dictionary, which is where you're seeing that entry as part of your Stylebook Online subscription, thank you for pointing this out and say they will consider a revision. Informally, you're right that it's often used as a noun.



Answer

Yes, that's fine.


Answer

Capitalize it. Here's the entry:


Earth 


Capitalize when used as the proper name of the planet, lowercase for other uses. The astronauts returned to Earth. He hopes to move heaven and earth. She is down-to-earth. The moon, Earth and sun lined up to create the only total lunar eclipse this year.
See planets.


Answer

You could use AP style, which is gray:

gray  Not grey. But: greyhound. 

Answer

No. The period always goes inside the quotation marks in AP style.


Answer

No, it's correct. See the first sentence of the section in question:

If a paragraph does not start with quotation marks but ends with a quotation that is continued in the next paragraph, do not use close-quote marks at the end of the introductory paragraph if the quoted material constitutes a full sentence. Use close-quote marks, however, if the quoted material does not constitute a full sentence. For example:
He said, "I am shocked and horrified by the slaying.
"I am so horrified, in fact, that I will ask for the death penalty."
But: He said he was "shocked and horrified by the slaying."
"I am so horrified, in fact, that I will ask for the death penalty," he said.


Answer

I don't think quotation marks are necessary. The meaning is clear without them. On another point, AP style doesn't use the Oxford comma in simple series such as these:

Some of the negative age-related words that Levy used in her study include decline, dependent, dementia and dying, while the positive ones included guidance, wise, insightful and enlightened. 

Answer

We'd avoid such constructions. How about just: Joe Smith, the show's director, writer and producer, created ...


Answer

We refer to, for instance, the indigenous Maori people.

Answer

It's probably clear in the context without a hyphen. It could, indeed, go either way. There's no absolute on this one!




Answer

Yes.

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