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Last Seven Days

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A company that produces ....

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I'm with you on that! No plans to change.

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Thanks for your thoughts. We're talking about these and related points this year. As you note, we have in recent years crafted some individual entries with wording aimed at reflecting balance, precision and empathy, a recognition that the words used in news reporting should account for human dignity. Some Ask the Editor responses from years past may reflect older thinking. We are working to update the older answers, but it's a very long process.

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Confounding indeed!

Your second option works best: Contains free-radical-fighting ingredients. Those hyphens link all elements of the compound modifier. It's not visually attractive, but it's the clear and accurate option.

This option indicates that the product has radical-fighting ingredients that are available for free: Contains free radical-fighting ingredients.

This option could be interpreted in a couple of ways and the reader doesn't know which is the right way.  Contains free radical fighting ingredients.

I can't resist adding an admonition to stay away from commas: Contains free, radical, fighting ingredients definitely is not what you want! You know that, of course, but it was fun to write.

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Resisting the urge to AP-lingocize it to passthru, we'd make it pass-through if someone else uses it as a noun. We would avoid such a use on our own. And yes, also hyphenated as a compound modifier.

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Yes, we'd advise indentation.

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Generally I change any due to to because. Why? Just because. The phrase you note is so commonly used, though, that changing it probably would be more jarring than simply leaving the stilted language in place. 

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Commas generally are optional with short introductory phrases. Whether to use them depends on the flow of the sentence and on what you're emphasizing.

On Thursday, he resigned. On Friday, he flew to Bermuda. On Saturday, he bought a boat.
On Thursday he resigned, packed all his worldly belongings and headed off to Bermuda.


But, I'd always use a comma to separate two proper nouns:

On Thursday, Mike resigned.
In May, Mike resigned.




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The 30 mph winds and the 30-mile-per-hour winds. We'll expand the mph and miles per hour entries to note that. Thanks!

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Two words: key box and key lock.

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Thanks for pointing this out! After discussion, here's our approach in the future:
Tesla is treating the Semi as a model, similar to its Roadster or Model S. We capitalize vehicle model names, so we will capitalize Semi when we are referencing Tesla’s Semi.

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That construction is very common everywhere. I really don't think it's ambiguous; it echoes the way we speak: We decided Tuesday to take a quick vacation. To my ear and eye, adding an on makes it harder to read. It doesn't flow naturally. If the meaning is that the bill review would be Monday, we would say: The president said he would review the bill Monday. Or, the president said Tuesday he would review the bill Thursday.

This is fine: The president said Monday that he would review the bill. Sometimes the that is needed for clarity. But if it's not necessary, we tend to omit it.

We do add an on if a day is in conjunction with a proper name: We will start our trip to Vermont on Tuesday, not We will start our trip to Vermont Tuesday.

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The first choice seems fine. I don't think people would be confused by that.

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Either of these: Smoke only in designated areas. Smoke in designated areas only. 

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Yes, quotation marks work well for that purpose.

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Yes, resortwear, following the same model as the others.

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If V means "vintage" in this abbreviation, better to rephrase to avoid the hackneyed "may" formulation. The V in SVRA stands for "vintage," but that doesn't mean ...

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There's no specific rule. What you have works just fine.

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In a Washington Post commentary, new National Education Association President Jack Spratt ... 

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It's a little hard to tell without the context (namely, the full story). If you're confident it's entirely clear that all the quotes are from the same person, it may be OK to omit at least some of the attribution. I suspect, though, that omitting all the instances of he says or she says could look odd even if it's clear. 

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It may be old school, but we're old school in our view of this and would recommend retaining the comma. On a related point: We also like periods at the end of sentences.

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Double-chocolate cake is clearer, I think.

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You see AP stories with italics? Interesting. Next time you see an example, let me know. Thanks!

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You are correct.

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We certainly would consider one or both. I can't say what the outcome would be. FYI, we also have to take into consideration our customers' systems. Even if we could transmit as you describe, not all of them necessarily could receive or process it correctly.

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